Collection: Unit 4 experience and environment

Research and Development

Initial Observations

Initial observations on Royal Veterinary College and Making Nature exhibition. Objects and specimens that would kick start thought for my own exhibition.

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Books

After initial observations, I researched the idea of Cabinets of Curiosities and animal x-rays. It was really interesting to find particular artists that could ANCHOR my exhibition! 

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Online Research

Initial research into what topic in the theme of ethics could I go into? The ones that stood out after some online research was selective breeding and also a clip on the legal battle of Foie gras (California, USA). 

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Interim Crit

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I desperately need a NARRATIVE and a target audience! Then all the other inventory pieces will fall into place. Narrowing down to one single aspect of ethics...

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More development

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Selective breeding - what if we breed the wrong cats together?

Toygers and Bengals have been bred to look more like wildcats (Ocelot and Tiger). Specifically bred to have rosettes which are spots or strips on wildcats. What if you inbred 'close relatives'? In this video it often time and again emphasise the point that the breeders go to conventions (cat shows) to exchange information and views. 

The word "might" is heard in this. I might be able to breed this with that to get this, like a maths equation. There are laws that forbid a specific breed that hasn't been bred for more than 6 generations from New York, because they might be violent (due to the wild gene from its ancestor).

For the exhibition, this video gave me an inspiration! Obviously it would be based on animal ethics through their own eyes, by putting visitors in 'their shoes'.

But I have the concept of a debate. So for example, this video could show the 'nice' cat breed that resembles its wild cousins (tigers, lion.etc.) whereas on the other hand, the dark side where humans inbred dogs which created bulldogs. As a common knowledge we know that they have been bred which in turn cause them to have trouble with breathing!

 

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This video concentrates on the ban on the idea of Foie gras in California. There was a huge lawsuit/debate of banning it but in the end it passed through but was then removed for some reason.

It is a great example of what I would want to include in my exhibition.

Because we, as humans, anthropomorphise animals! Many haven't actually seen the environments or treatment of 'force-feeding' geese or ducks to create this delicacy. Dr. Jeanne Smith DVM, who is a 'bird expert', as described in the footage, pointed out that birds in general do not have a gag-reflex. And so would not feel distressed as the tube would not be blocking the airway, and that they have the capability to store a large quantity of fat in their bodies due to their ancestral idea of migration.

So in the exhibition, this may be a short clip of the video or photography piece of how people perceive the animal and on the other side how animals perceive humans. But what inventory specifically?

 

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Legal/illegal poaching

Similar to Regent's Park Zoo (1930), this is an experience where the animal is the 'main character'. This experience through the Science Museum is to show that "Science is fun"...through the eyes of cockroaches!

The experience is curated by the arts group, Superflex. Specialising in ideas that challenge the role of the artist in contemprary society. Exploring the nature of globalisation and system power. Addressing serious social and cultural concerns throught the art of humour. 

In this piece, the issue is climate change? Tour guides will point out, presumably with an articulated proboscis,  exhibits that illustrate the impact science and technology are having on our planet. 

INSPIRATION: By giving the group Superflex commission. The inspiration would be through the eyes of animals based on the illegal/legal poaching. Maybe it could be an experience on the basis of selected exhibition pieces that I've chosen? So their job would be to create an interactive element that anchors the debate of poaching. sense of sight (VISION)

Debate:  Can animals give consent? The idea is that poachers take, for example, elephants tusks but does that mean the elephant consents? Same initiative as rape!!

references: http://londonist.com/2011/01/tour-the-science-museum-in-a-cockroach-costume

     http://superflex.net/information/

 

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Zoo/sanctuary animal encounters

Animal lovers go to these places to see animals up close and also because they believe that these establishments are in business of taking anumals that have nowhere else to go. It is estimated that there are at least 5,000 tigers in captivity in the United States. Sanctuaries occupy a ‘grey area’, to take in and care for any animals that have been abused, neglected, or abandoned. Zoos are created specifically to exhibit animals to the public. The controversy comes down to how much the animals are ued to draw in a paying public. ‘animal encounters’ allow visitors to handle/hope the beast for a picture or for feeding. But have they considered the physical/mental trauma that this may have on the animal? Most are attracted to infants or cubs because they are ‘cute’. Because these animals have been in contact with humans at a very young age, this has normalised the idea. Televised and exposed the masses. In percussions the animals are unable to return back to the wild, which are advertised by majority of wildlife sanctuaries...

exhibit idea: animatronic animal toys displayed in a 'petting zoo'/ 'animal encounters' as seen in zoos (feeding, petting. lol) 

SENSE OF TOUCH   /   debate: Are zoos/sanctuaries positive educational? 

references: http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2014/03/140320-animal-sanctuary-wildlife-exotic-tiger-zoo/

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Ban or don't ban fox hunting?

Dogs have a keen ability to discriminate among smells. An Auburn tracking dog can follow a single human trail, laid more than 24 hours before, across a campus crisscrossed by tens of thousands of students. And through selective breeding, humans are able to create a specimen which would be as fast as a fox for hunting. Fox hunting, in which groups of riders follow a pack of hounds trained to track down and kill foxes, is a centuries-old sport that has long divided Britons. Opponents consider it a cruel pastime reserved for the rich, while supporters say it is an important rural tradition and an effective form of pest control. Fox hunting is back on the agenda in Britain in recent years after ex-Prime Minister David Cameron’s government has stirred up a political form to a vote to loosen a decade-old ban on the divisive sport! So why so much argument around this sport?

exhibition idea: an interactive game within a space? like the game bulldog! more research+experiments needed...a bit loose

debate: Is this a game or sport? focusing on each definition...

references: http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2013-05/five-feats-smell#page-5

   http://news.nationalpost.com/news/world/fox-hunting-controversy-heats-up-after-u-k-government-announces-plan-to-loosen-ban

    http://www.brighthubeducation.com/science-homework-help/129257-fox-hunt-tradition-and-controversy/

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